Wednesday, April 04, 2018

Labor of love?

At the current pace, we could have a total of 6000 posts on this blog by early next year; currently, we have about about 5700 posts. I've written nearly all of them; I have collaborated with Benster and Fearless Maria on a few hundred, and Mrs. D and my brother Stinger (alive and well, by the way) have weighed in periodically, but for the most part, it's been my deal.

That's a lot of blogging. I'm wondering how much longer I'll want to do this, though. I never tried to reach a mass audience; there have been times where a post of mine might get several hundred page views, but it's usually been because I insulted (or was perceived to have insulted) a small, passionate group of people. Don't piss off the Eric Carmen Fan Club. Or if you want page views, maybe you should. Go all the way.

But if writing (and blogging) is a labor of love, does it last?  I'm not certain. Lately Glenn Reynolds has been suggesting that blogging is ripe for a comeback. I'm not sure I agree, but it's possible. Most of my regular commenters operate blogs of their own, or have in the past. Do you sense, at this point, there's an opportunity for a resurgence?

7 comments:

Bike Bubba said...

Wrestling with the same thing--and let me start by saying I appreciate what you do, even though we don't always agree 100%. Regarding the notion of whether blogging will come back, watching my kids suggests that there is a lot of stuff with really short comments, but once you get beyond 282 characters, that's not where I see young people reading. Yes, I'm concerned that too many people aren't thinking in complete sentences.

Part of me wants to continue for a very simple reason; blogging is today's version of leaflets as practiced ever since Gutenberg, and there is an awful lot of knowledge and wisdom that can be obtained if we learn to express thoughts longer than 282 characters. So for me, blogging is self-development, and also a hint of encouragement for others to do the same. And there might be an off chance that we make an impact elsewhere in society, too.

Brad Carlson said...

Lately Glenn Reynolds has been suggesting that blogging is ripe for a comeback. I'm not sure I agree, but it's possible. Most of my regular commenters operate blogs of their own, or have in the past. Do you sense, at this point, there's an opportunity for a resurgence?

I agree with Glenn, especially in light of Twitter suspending/restricting conservatives on their forum for offenses which pale in comparison to those of leftist tweeters. It's almost as if many bloggers were enticed by the pithiness of social media that they were willing to let blogging fall by the wayside. Now it seems the blogs are one of the few remaining online venues where righties can opine without fear of being shut down.

Mr. D said...

Wrestling with the same thing--and let me start by saying I appreciate what you do, even though we don't always agree 100%.

Right back at ya, Bubba.

So for me, blogging is self-development, and also a hint of encouragement for others to do the same. And there might be an off chance that we make an impact elsewhere in society, too.

That's a good way to approach it. I need to devote more time to blogging, but I've found it difficult to do so in recent years. Time is always the challenge.

Mr. D said...

I agree with Glenn, especially in light of Twitter suspending/restricting conservatives on their forum for offenses which pale in comparison to those of leftist tweeters. It's almost as if many bloggers were enticed by the pithiness of social media that they were willing to let blogging fall by the wayside. Now it seems the blogs are one of the few remaining online venues where righties can opine without fear of being shut down.

I've had a Twitter account for a number of years, but I never got the hang of it. It's become a tough place for righties to opine because the medium attracts angry people, and lefties are usually more angry and vindictive than righties. I'm glad you're still blogging, Brad.

W.B. Picklesworth said...

My experience is that I have fewer available hours to accomplish more meaningful tasks. Marriage, kids, profession, being a very minor celebrity in a very small town will do that. I like the idea of a blogging resurgence, but I doubt I'll be part of it in the next few years.

On the other hand, I love the idea of it. As I recall, there were different modes/platforms/groups that helped facilitate this before Twitter and Facebook got poaching. The M.O.B. obviously. But there was another group led initially by Frank Fleming, I think. It was a great way for "little guy" bloggers to connect and meet new people.

Gino said...

what i liked best about bloggings hey day was the interaction between blogs. the friendly smack talk, and such like that.
will it come back?
i doubt it.

R.A. Crankbait said...

Blogging was a good habit - a routine that kept me curious and on the alert for blog fodder. Sometimes the posts almost wrote themselves, but often it took more time than I would have expected. As I eventually fell out of the habit, I didn’t really find more productive things to do with my time. When I had a serious heath issue, though, starting a new blog gave me an outlet for sounding out some things that were in my head and sharing with others. I felt there was something valuable in that. As that ran its course I came to look at the exercise in a different light. Now My objective isn’t regular posting, but Ilike having a venue to post things of import to me or that might be shared. It’s not changing the world, but I kept he sites registered and Ilke thatl I have a place ortwo to share my voice when it suits me. I do enjoy stopping by everyday, though!