Tuesday, May 21, 2019

The same thing everywhere you go

Reporting from Australia, where the leftish Labor Party went down to an ignominious defeat over the weekend, Claire Lehmann sees some familiar behaviors:
Progressive politicians like to assume that, on election day at least, blue-collar workers and urban progressives will bridge their differences, and make common cause to support leftist economic policies. This assumption might once have been warranted. But it certainly isn’t now—in large part because the intellectuals, activists and media pundits who present the most visible face of modern leftism are the same people openly attacking the values and cultural tastes of working and middle-class voters. And thanks to social media (and the caustic news-media culture that social media has encouraged and normalized), these attacks are no longer confined to dinner-party titterings and university lecture halls. Brigid Delaney, a senior writer for Guardian Australia, responded to Saturday’s election result with a column about how Australia has shown itself to be “rotten.” One well-known Australian feminist and op-ed writer, Clementine Ford, has been fond of Tweeting sentiments such as “All men are scum and must die.” Former Australian Race Discrimination Commissioner Tim Soutphommasane, who also has served as a high-profile newspaper columnist, argues that even many mainstream political positions—such as expressing concern about the Chinese government’s rising regional influence—are a smokescreen for racism.
Rotten. Scum, Racist. Yeah, that's all quite familiar. If you actually engage on social media, you're likely to be called all those things, whether you're Down Under or in a coffee shop in Linden Hills. Haters are more likely to let their freak flags fly these days and while it's no long astonishing to see it, the ferocity still can bring you up short. 

2 comments:

Bike Bubba said...

The Klan just wears black shirts and face masks instead of sheets these days, it seems. Also just saw a bit about Google apparently making things very difficult on Christian employees who are dumb enough to speak up on their message boards.

Come to think of it, it's actually pretty encouraging that Google has those. I don't know that I'd ever comment on a company message board with anything vaguely controversial at any place I've ever worked. It's like I've learned something over the years.

R.A. Crankbait said...

Come to think of it, it's actually pretty encouraging that Google has those. I don't know that I'd ever comment on a company message board with anything vaguely controversial at any place I've ever worked. It's like I've learned something over the years.

A couple of months ago I was selected to be an interview subject on our global company's internal website. It was for a feature that had just started, seeking to spotlight "interesting" employees. Apparently I'm interesting due to coming back to work from an incurable terminal disease. They asked me nine or ten questions on my background, favorite things, and "most interesting" thing I've seen in the last ten years. I responded with my "return to work" experience, including attribution of the miracle. The spiritual aspect was edited out, though they left in the fact that five years ago I was given five years to live.

I understood it, given our global employment, but an earlier spotlight had featured an employee who included a lay from the Koran. They did, however, leave in my favorite quote: "You know, O man, what is good: to act justly, love mercy, and walk humbly with your God."